Jodhpur | The Blue City of India (Rajasthan Travel Vlog)


What’s up? I’m Alex. I’m Marko, and you’re watching Vagabrothers. And this is the Blue City of Rajasthan India, Jodhpur. Good morning everybody. Welcome back to Jodhpur. We are in the Blue City, also known as the Sun City, and that’s pretty easy to see why. It’s very hot very early, but we have an awesome day of exploring in front of us, don’t we? We just woke up to a beautiful sunrise over the fort which dominates the city, but we’re staying here in this beautiful old haveli. This actually used to be home to the accountant of the Maharaja, and so we’re going to go walk around the old town. It’s a labyrinth of blue -walled houses that kind of creeps up to the edge of the fort, take a slow way to get there and hopefully catch a nice sunset at the fort this afternoon. Let’s go Now we’re at the gates of the old city right next to the clock tower where the central market is, and Jodhpur has been a trading city for centuries. It’s right between Gujarat and Delhi, which was a trade route that exchanged opium, copper, date-palms, and sandalwood as well, which smells great if you’ve never smelt it. It’s a pretty incredible little place There’s tons of vendors, tons of stuff to look at and potentially buy. So we’re going to go ahead into the market and see if we can find anything fun. Anything good? All good? One of my favorite things about marketplaces anywhere in the world is just watching the vendors kind of set up their stalls and scream out, yell out what they’re selling, trying to get customers. But here in India, it takes like a whole new level. It’s really awesome to be here early and experience this. It’s a very, very unique moment, and it’s something that happens here all the time. These guys here making fresh garlands. Garland’s are basically like lays that they make for religious ceremonies in the Hindu religion. And it smells really good. And it’s kind of that combination of fresh flowers and fruits and spices with dirty water and open sewers that kind of make India have that smell of amazing and disgusting at the same time. Something as simple as taking a walk down the street is a total assault on all of your senses. But it’s fascinating and after a while, you just kind of get used to it. Here’s to India. See what I mean? So we have found this beautiful little chai wallah in this painted little courtyard off one of these side streets. Like we said earlier, Jodhpur is the Blue City. Lots of the buildings are painted this nice kind of like off- blue. That’s to keep the buildings cool, which you can definitely feel in here. Even though it’s hot outside, they have this tarp over us and the blue paints, and it just feels nice and chill. You’ve got to be constantly alert in India because there’re people on bikes; there’re donkeys; there’re camels. There’s pretty much everything imaginable coming at you at all time. But it’s nice to kind of peel off the main street, have a chai, and start our morning a little bit slower. It’s very funny like in most European cities, our first thing is to find a nice coffee shop, and you might use the internet to do that. In India, it’s all about finding a chai wallah, And there’s no way these guys are listed online. You just have to go and find a cool spot, sit yourself down, and order chai. So one of the things as a traveler here in India that you will notice right off the bat, and you’ve probably seen a lot in the vlogs already, is the symbol of the swastika. And it’s kind of a crazy story because in the West we instantaneously associate the swastika with Nazism, but it’s actually a Hindu symbol, and it signifies peace. The Nazis actually took that symbol and inverted it, and it’s crazy how a symbol that means peace could be so perverted and switched to mean something so much more dark. But just want to let you guys know that if you see that symbol here in India, it has nothing to do with Nazism, and it’s a symbol for peace. It’s also interesting that the Nazis used the word Aryan to describe what they found to be the purest form of white race, but in reality the Aryans were an empire that…. one of the first major empires here in India.. and help laid the foundations of a lot of Hinduism, everything from the caste system to some of the most sacred texts in Hinduism. They all come from the period of the Aryans, about a couple thousand years ago. It turns out that different days of the week are dedicated to different gods. Today is Tuesday. Today’s Hahnemann’s day. Tomorrow, Wednesday, is for Ganesh. It’s kind of like in English; we have Sunday and Monday for the sun and the moon. Thursday for Thor. Friday for priests and all these other old ancient Norse gods that still stick around the language. But here in India, they actually practice it. Every day a different god. All right. Well, now we are officially lost back here, but it’s so cool, and that’s one of the best parts about traveling, especially in this part of the world is like just going into the residential areas and getting lost in the little alleyways, seeing how people live and saying hello to the locals. Last time I was here, I came here during Diwali, the Festival of Lights, and the whole place was illuminated with little candles people put out. I remember walking through at dusk and just seeing this beautiful orange glow illuminating the evening sunset reflection off the walls, and it’s just magical. And coming back here is equally nice. So we’re just wandering through the old town, basically right along the edge of the fort at the top of the hill, and it’s super cool. It’s much like a European medieval city with all these really narrow winding streets. But it’s really cool to see look into everyone’s windows and just see people doing the daily errands. There’s one guy over there reading a newspaper peeling potatoes; another guy here ironing clothes, and it’s just so cool when you walk through these streets. You just get to look straight into people’s windows and get a glimpse into everyday life. I think we’ve found my favorite Hindu god…. It’s the god of sex. Don’t want to be disrespectful, but it kind of looks like a glory hole. And I’m not really sure what you’re supposed to put inside those holes. But it’s funny because modern Indian society is relatively conservative with respect to sex. But back in the day the Kama Sutra and such was much more liberated, much more open. So, we’ll see. All right so we’ve ducked in off the streets to some sanctuary. We’ve popped into Ronnie Male Haveli, and it’s a 400 year old building. There’s a restaurant and a hotel here. This building is a haveli just like the hotel that we’re staying in. I’ve come to realize that these are probably the best deals for mid-range travelers. For under $50 a night, you’re getting a really nice luxury experience. It’s not quite a palace which are also available, but these are just beautiful buildings. This one’s all red stone and it’s a great way to get a comfortable place to stay and also get an insight into history. So it’s a pretty simple meal. We’re just getting some paneer little almost like cheese fritters. We’ve got veg pakora, paneer pakora, and we have a little roti style thing called paratha. So we’re just kind of having a little bit of snack, getting out of the heat. It’s 12:45 right now, so it’s probably the hottest it’s going to be all day, but it’s nice and cool in this little alcove. We’re just all feeling a little bit sleepy at the height of the heat during the day. In this place we’ve got the fans on. We’re kind of underground here, so it’s nice and cool. And we’re just recharging, literally recharging our batteries for our phones and recharging our human batteries. This is basically a reservoir at the top of the mountain. In India they call them a tank, which collects monsoon water for drinking, bathing, and everyday use. What’s really cool here in Jodhpur is that all the streets have these little side canals coming off of them and I think all that water comes from here originally. It just kind of goes down the side of the street no matter where you’re walking. By the time it gets to the bottom, it’s pretty nasty. People definitely dump their trash and their sewage into that. The water has a blue tint, matches the city. We’re at the gates of Mehrangarh, and this is the fortress and palace where for 500 years the Maharajahs of Marwar ruled this area, and that name actually means in the Land of Death, and this is called Citadel of the Sun. That’s probably related. The Land of Death, the Sun. It is so hot here. Really, I can’t put it into words. When you’re walking around, you just are constantly getting rid of all the water that you put into your body. So we’re going to keep climbing, keep putting more water into our bodies, and eventually make it to the top of the Citadel up there to show you guys the view from the top of the fort. You ready? Yeah, let’s go. Behind us are these red handprints on the wall, and this is from a tradition that dates back to when newly widowed wives, like if someone would die in battle, the wives would dip their hands per million and then paint it on the wall before jumping on the husband’s funeral pyre. It happens across India, but here in Rajasthan it’s something that was really much associated with battle, and that’s why the Rajasthanis have a reputation for bravery. So right now we are in the Phool Mahal, which means the Palace of Flowers. It was built in the 18th century. The ceiling is covered in gold filigree, one of the nicest rooms in the entire palace. So interesting fact about this fort. It’s home to a couple thousand black tights, which are thought to be the most abundant bird of prey on earth, but they’re protected here and they’re actually fed by the employees of the palace, and they have been for hundreds of years. The guy who feeds them, his father did it, his grandfather did it, and if you take a look up, it’s pretty incredible. This fort was once home to one of India’s greatest rulers of all time, Akbar. Akbar was the grandson of Babur who was the first mughal to invade India from Afghanistan. He was related to the royal family of Jodhpur. When he was staying here, the house astrologers read his fortune and said that he was destined to be a great king, and it turned out to be true. So there actually are still house astrologers here, and we’re going to go get our fortunes read and see what the palm says about our future. Because there is just a sense of the sun inside us. So we find that all second fences are people around us as moving stars in the sky, as a galaxy system in the same way. So we give energy. Overall good news. He told me that I am bound for success, that I should avoid swimming in the ocean on full moons because it’s dangerous. My lucky number is three. I should be wearing green and light, light yellow. And that I’m destined to do a lot of publication and writing in the next couple years, but I shouldn’t start new projects in July. It’s almost sunset. We’ve left the fort, and we are in pursuit of what looks to be the perfect place to film the sunset and get our VR shot of Jodhpur. We found it from the top of the fortress. It’s supposed to be outside the fortress walls on a little hillside But to get there we were trying to triangulate the position using photos and Google Maps. And as Celine just said, the X on a map never ever shows the position of a treasure. Re-do. It’s like Indiana Jones, right? It’s exactly like Indiana Jones. It never ends well. We’ve just hopped off the rickshaws, and I have found a group of the best dressed dudes in Rajasthan. Check it out. Are you a band? music? Oh cool. Can I take your photo? We’re hustling right now. Trying to make it out to this viewpoint to get the VR shot for sunset. The fort is just up there. We found an epic spot for the sunset. It’s also a temple, so shoes off, if you’re wondering. Check out the view. All right. Well we made it to Sunset Point. This is the spot we’ve been trying to get to all day. It’s been a serious challenge. Google Maps does not work here, but apart from that, it’s been a total adventure and such a fun day here in Jodhpur. Honestly, what a great day. We’ve seen three awesome cities. Tomorrow we go to Pushkar for the Camel Festival. So stay tuned for that. If you like this video give it a thumbs- up, share with your travel buddies, and subscribe to Vagabrothers and turn on notifications, if you have not already. And in the meantime remember stay curious, keep exploring, and we’ll see you guys on the road. Peace. Namaste.

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